Daily Telegraph - Business turns to educating parents in the workforce

Business turns to educating parents-to-be at work in the hope of keeping women in the workforce

LISA MAYOH AND DANIEL MEERS, THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, MARCH 07, 2015 12:00AM

BUSINESS giants such as Westpac and Qantas have begun offering mums and dads free parenting courses as they recognise a $25 billion opportunity to keep women in the workplace.

The major corporations are turning to a Sydney University academic’s education program for employees before they go on maternity leave, and when they return.

The new trend means that instead of the scenario in which women relied on their own mother, aunts or siblings for parental advice, they can now go to work to learn everything from how to juggle demanding children with a career as well as how to manage toddler tantrums.

Parenting author, and speaker Rosina McAlpine described the phenomenon as “win-win parenting”.

Read the full article here

PARENTING TIPS

  1. Bust the myth we ‘magically’ know how to be a good parent. We aren’t born with the skills — we need practical knowledge, skills and experience for everyday parenting, especially challenging moments.
  2. Use simple framework SEE — which stands for Stop, Empathy Education. Instead of reacting to challenging moments, use those three steps to respond to children for a more positive experience.
  3. This applies from baby to teenagers in any situation for getting ready for school, managing emotions, dealing with bullying, getting kids to share, listening at home, tantrums etc.
  4. Move away from discipline, rewards and punishment. Instead, use empathy and education to develop life skills in kids and deepen the deep bond with parents and children.
  5. Become your ‘personal best parent’ by taking care of yourself, role modelling for your children, learning about good parenting and using the SEE approach.
  6. Be in a place to respond, empathise and help children learn how to be in the world. As parents learn, they feel more confident, they drop guilt and stress and their children have better outcomes.